Informative Speech Topics & Example Speeches

Informative Speech Topics - Example Informative Speeches

Coming up with the right informative speech topics can be one of the most challenging parts of writing an informative speech.

Before you come up with an excellent topic, though, it is essential to understand the basic premise of an informative speech.

(Just looking for ideas without the speech-writing guidelines? Jump straight to my list of topics here.)

Informational and educational messages are, mostly, a way to provide your audience with knowledge on a given subject.

That information should be useful and helpful to those listening.

An excellent way to think of an informative presentation is as a teaching speech.

Informative speech topics

Your job is to teach the audience everything they need to know about the chosen subject: such as the effects of caffeine on the body, for example, or marriage rituals around the world!

Start with Good Informative Speech Topics & You'll Write Great Informative Speeches

Good informative speeches start with concrete ideas and a good outline.

Make sure that each piece of information you offer audience members is relevant to the topic you have chosen. Everything in your speech should be of value to audience members.

Selecting the right informative speech topics is easily one of the hardest parts of the speech process. However, a few methods make the process easier. 

First, recognize that in many real-life speaking situations, circumstances and the audience dictate the speech topic.

For an obvious example, if your boss has asked you to speak during your morning meeting about the new software your company recently purchased. Your chosen informative speech topic would be the program your boss wants you to discuss.

However, there are times you will have to come up with your ideas for informative speech topics. In a classroom setting, for example, the teacher will often allow you to choose the issue on which you'd like to base your speech.

To narrow down the field of topics, think about the things YOU find interesting. 

For example, if you are a fan of a famous novelist, such as Stephen King, you might want to make a speech about that person. If you have an interesting part-time job, this might be a good time to tell people about what you do and the different aspects it involves

I've always enjoyed online publishing, and this makes a great informative speech topic as most people are curious about what this type of job consists!

Even if you do have experience in your chosen topic, to deliver a robust, informative speech, you'll still need to do your research! Nevertheless, your experiences with that subject will make an excellent supplement to your research materials. There's no doubt. Natural enthusiasm about a subject comes across to the audience hearing a speech.

How to Come Up with Informative Speech Topics

There are several ways to come up with some perfect ideas!

The first is to check out my list of good informative speech topics.

If you didn't find anything here that inspired you, ask what you know. Or, what do you want to know? Another great way to find a topic is to think about areas of knowledge you're currently unfamiliar but would be very interested in researching.

Your goal would be to learn enough about the subject to not only understand it yourself but also to present it to audience members in a clear, logical fashion.

Quite a challenge, but also very rewarding!

Another option is mind-mapping with software like Freemind or brainstorming with classmates, instructors, family, and friends for possible ideas. Other people make great sounding-boards when you get stuck!

For example, assume that all you can come up with is the general topic area of "basketball," Your classmates may help you think of other ideas. Brainstorming can identify questions stemming from the general subject of the sport: the history of the game, perhaps, or a speech about some of the game's greatest heroes.

When you use this method, though, use it with a measure of caution. You want to choose something that will capture the audience's interest, not just that of the people involved in the decision-making process.

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